“Which Ad Experience Do You Prefer?”

The first time Hulu asked me this question, I was pleasantly surprised. A company that wants to know about my preferences and save me the trouble of having to view completely irrelevant ads? Amazing!

The tenth time Hulu asked me this question, I was annoyed. Don’t they know which experience I prefer by now? I login every day to watch my favorite shows, and they still don’t know anything about me? Annoying!

Clearly, the ad experience I prefer is a relevant one – and I’m definitely not alone. 58% of consumers admit to being annoyed by ads they don’t need (InsightsOne), while 86% of consumers say personalization plays a role in their purchasing decisions (Infosys).

The days of Don Draper and his “mad men” are far behind us – but modern marketers are still struggling to implement the technology and strategies needed to reach consumers with relevance across ad placements.

With access to increasingly more channels and devices, consumers are creating over 2.5 exabytes of data – that’s more than 2.5 billion gigabytes – every single day. What’s more, about 75% of this data is unstructured, coming from sources like social networks, text messages and videos (BBC).

Knowing this amount of “big data” is out there, how do you even begin to capture it? How do you filter through it and determine what’s important? And how do you act on it in a meaningful, purpose-driven way?

These types of questions call for a new data-driven, identity-centric advertising approach. In fact, a recent report by Neustar shows that companies using first-party consumer data to inform ad campaigns can increase conversion rates by up to 98%!

Our new eBook examines how advertisers can successfully leverage and optimize audience data and use it to:

  • Go beyond retargeting
  • Create cross-channel impact
  • Increase rate cards
  • Uncover new and highly valuable segments
  • Optimize keywords and creatives with UGC

Download the free eBook here, and start making the transition from mad men to mad scientists.

By Rachel Serpa